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    Learn about contested and uncontested divorces to see what would be best suited for your situation.

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Divorce Lawyer in Nashville

The Differences Between Contested & Uncontested Divorces

There are two paths you can take when pursuing a divorce in Tennessee. The decision you make at this fork in the road will generally depend on your relationship with your soon-to-be ex-spouse. At Martin Sir & Associates, we help clients that are pursuing both contested and uncontested divorces.

With more than 30 years of experience and an Avvo Client's Choice Award for Divorce, you can trust that we understand what we are doing and know how to navigate through even the most contentious of relationships.

The Uncontested Divorce: A Faster and Easier Method

For couples who still get along and can amicably discuss the terms of their divorce, uncontested divorce is the way to go. In an uncontested divorce, the two spouses sit down together and patiently discuss the terms of their divorce.

Together, divorcing parties will make decisions about:

The couple then writes all of their decisions into the petition for dissolution of marriage. Generally, if the judge does not see anything in the petition that violates Tennessee laws, he or she will approve the divorce and enforce all terms.

Many people opt for uncontested divorce because:

  • It is generally faster than contested divorce
  • It is generally cheaper than contested divorce
  • It keeps children out of the drama of the divorce
  • It allows the couples to decide the terms of their divorce on their own, rather than leaving it up to a judge

Contested Divorce: When You Can't Get Along

If you and your spouse are not on speaking terms, are not in agreement about the divorce, or cannot discuss terms together, then you will need to opt for a contested divorce. This involves appearing in court with a family law advocate to determine the terms for termination of the marriage. With the help of an attorney, you will be required to fight for your preferences on terms of the divorce. A judge will then decide the best way to approach your specific case.

Contested divorces are generally more expensive, take longer, and involve a high degree of emotional turmoil. However, they are also necessary in situations where couples cannot work together to reach decisions concerning their divorce.

Whether you are seeking a contested divorce or an uncontested divorce, speak with our Nashville divorce attorneys to secure reliable representation!

  • Top Rated Attorneys

    Our lawyers have been given the highest ratings and accolades for their commitment to legal excellence.

    What Sets Us Apart
  • Getting
    Divorced?

    Highly knowledgeable regarding Tennessee divorce law, we can help you work through this process.

    Receive Legal Help
  • Knowing Your Options

    Learn about contested and uncontested divorces to see what would be best suited for your situation.

    Types of Divorce
  • Free Case Consultation

    Our team is ready to review your situation to start building your case. Fill out our convenient online form or call today!

    Get Started Now

Contact Us

Martin Sir & Associates
Nashville Divorce Attorney
Located at: 424 Church Street,
Suite 2250,

Nashville, TN 37219
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Phone: (615) 266-4505
Website:
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Disclaimer

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.